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    Tuesday
    Jun112019

    IRC Rule Changes for 2019 (Full)

    Also see https://ircrating.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/irc_rule_changes_2019.pdf

    A word used as defined by ERS is printed in bold.

    A word used as defined by IRC Definitions is printed underlined
    Proposed deletions are printed in ITALICS

    Effective Date: IRC Rule changes apply from 1st January 2019, except in countries with June-May validity, where changes apply from 1st June 2019. See Rule 8.12

     

    1. RIG FACTOR

    Reason for change:

    Rule 21.2.2 and 21.2.3 describe how Rig Factor is applied. The rules uses the term “above/below unity” which is not easily understood and Rig Factor may be adjusted up or down for different rig features resulting in a Rig Factor above or below 1. e.g. a boat could have Rig Factor increased for exotic rig materials but decreased for in-mast furling and the result may not be above or below 1.

    Amend:

    page2image1423518384 page2image1423518640

    Effect:

    1. 21.2.2  RF above unity may be applied may be increased for: fractional, racing and lightweight rigs, high aspect ratio and efficient plan forms, wing and double luff sails, specialised sail stiffening, large headboards/cranes, permanently bent or highly controllable spars, hi-tech rigging, exotic rig materials, advanced winch and deck gear arrangements, flush/efficient deck design, and any other feature which increases sailing efficiency that is not already rated through the rated dimensions.

    2. 21.2.3  RF below unity may be applied to may be decreased for: less efficient rigs and sail plans, cruising furling sails, motor sailers with large deck houses, cruisers with weight/windage aloft or with basic deck gear only, or any other feature which reduces sailing efficiency that is not already rated through the rated dimensions.

      Better clarity and reflects current rating practises.


      2. P, PY DEFINITION AND RULE

      Reason for change: Following discussions with owners & sailmakers during sail measurement it has been identified that consideration could be given

      to reviewing the IRC Definitions of P, PY and upper limit mark. The current rule for the position of the mainsail relies on ERS B.1.1 which does not take into account the situation when a mast may not have a mast upper limit mark. In addition the current definition of P and PY would be clearer using ERS upper point in addition to ERS upper limit mark to define the measurement point.

      Add new rule:
      21.5.3 The highest visible point of a mainsailmizzen or foremast sail projectedat 90° to the mast spar, shall be set below the upper point, or in the absence of an upper limit mark, below the top of highest sheave used for the halyard.

      Amended definition of P:

      The distance between the mainsail (in the case of a schooner, the foremast sail) upper point, and the top of the boom when set at right angles to the mast, or the mainsail tack point whichever is lower, on the mainmast (in the case of a schooner, the foremast). The upper limit mark shall be permanently marked by a 25mm band of contrasting colour. If there is no upper limit mark the upper measurement point shall be taken as the top of the highest sheave used for the halyard. In the case of a gaff rig, the upper measurement point is the peak point of the mainsail or the head point of the topsail if on board.

      Amended definition of PY:

      The distance between the mizzen (in the case of a schooner, the mainmast sailupper point, and the top of the boom when set at right angles to the mast, or the mizzen tack point whichever is lower, on the mizzenmast (in the case of a schooner, the mainmast). The upper limit mark shall be permanently marked by a 25mm band of contrasting colour. If there is no upper limit mark the upper measurement point shall be taken as the top of the highest sheave used for the halyard.

      Effect: Make it clearer for mainsail and mizzen and position and measurement of P and PY.

      3. E, EY DEFINITION AND RULE

      Reason for change: Following discussions with owners & sailmakers during sail measurement it has been identified that consideration could be givento reviewing the IRC Definitions of E and outer limit mark. The current rule for the position of the mainsail relies on ERS B.1.3 which does not take into account the situation when a boom may not have a boom outer limit mark. In addition the current definition of E and EY would be clearer using ERS outer point distance in addition to ERS outer limit mark to define the measurement point.

      Add new rule:
      21.5.4 The aftmost visible point of the mainsailmizzen or foremast sailprojected at 90° to the boom spar, shall be set forward of the outer point, or in the absence of a boom outer limit mark, forward of the aft end of the boom.

      Amended definition of E:

      The outer point distance of a mainsail (or in the case of a schooner, a foremast sail). The outer limit mark shall be permanently marked by a 25mm band of contrasting colour. If there is no outer limit mark the outer measurement point shall be taken to the aft end of the boom. For the measurement of outer point distance, ERS H.4.2 shall not apply. Fittings, local curvature, local cutaway and any increase in the fore/aft dimension of a sail track and/or sail track support, shall be ignored.

      Amended definition of EY:
      The outer point distance of a mizzen (or in the case of a schooner, a mainsail). The outer limit mark shall be permanently marked by a 25mm band of contrasting colour. If there is no outer limit mark the outer measurement point shall be taken to the aft end of the boom.

      Effect: Make it clearer for mainsail position and measurement of E and EY

      4. NUMBER SPINNAKERS – IRC RULE 21.6.1

      Reason for change:

      Currently IRC Rule 21.6.1 describes how boats will be rated for carrying more than three spinnakers on board. The rule does not explicitly state that they should not carry more spinnakers than declared on their certificate. In addition, whilst three spinnakers is generally considered to be a minimum number for boats competitively racing, it does not consider that a significant number of club level boats only use 1 or 2 spinnakers. Feedback from the owners of these boats shows that they feel at a disadvantage as they have a reduced sail inventory and are not able to compete. To encourage boats within this sector of the fleet it is proposed to allow boats to declare that they will carry a number of spinnakers less than 3. This will open up the possibility for the technical committee to consider a rating decrease for either 1 or 2 spinnakers on that basis.

      Amend the rule 21.6.1 as follows:

      Boats shall not carry on board more than the number of spinnakers on their IRC certificate while racing.

      Effect: Make it clear the maximum number of spinnakers that shall be on board while racing. Open up the possibility to consider a rating decrease for less than 3 spinnakers.

      5. FURLING HEADSAIL – RULE 21.8.1(c)

      Reason for change: IRC rule 21.8.1(c) defines how a furling headsail is used. In the rule restricting the use of headsail to be not less than 95% of HSA there is

      a permissive “may” when the rule actually requires a restrictive “shall”. Amend Rule 21.8.1(c) as follows:

      21.8.1(c) Only a single headsail shall be used while racing, whose HSA shall not be less than 95% of rated HSA except that alternatively a storm jib (see Appendix 1) may be used.

      Effect: Make it clear that using a furling headsail of not less than 95% of HSA is a requirement.


      6. STL DEFINITION

      Reason for change:

      IRC definition STL addresses horizontal spinnaker tack point distance from the mast. The current rule does not make it clear that the spinnaker pole track and any fittings to the mast should be ignored in the measurement of STL. The current rule does not make it clear that bowsprit outer limit marks should be ignored in the measurement of STL.

      It is therefore proposed to amend IRC definition STL to make it clear that fittings on the mast and bowsprit outer limit marks are ignored when measuring STL.

      Amend STL definition as follows:

      STL The greatest horizontal distance from the forward face of the mast spar, ignoring any fittings and tracks, measured on or near the centreline of the boat, to any of the following:
      - the extremity of the 
      spinnaker polewhisker pole or bowsprit, ignoring any outer limit marks;

      - the spinnaker tack point on deck projected vertically as necessary;
      - if a headsail may be tacked forward of the forestay, the headsail tack point on deck projected vertically as necessary or to the extremity of the 
      bowsprit.

      Effect: Make it clear that spinnaker pole track and any fittings at the mast are ignored when measuring STL.

      Make it clear that bowsprit outer limit marks are ignored when measuring STL


      7. FORESTAY ADJUSTMENT – IRC RULE 21.1.6(b)

      ADDED AFTER IRC CONGRESS FOLLOWING REPRESENTATIONS AT THE MEETING

      Reason for change: Following representations at the IRC Congress meetings there is a request to remove the declaration of a forestay “not adjusted while

      racing” which results in no impact to TCC. This is on an understanding and perception that owners are using the adjustable forestay despite the declaration. The proposal is that IRC should rate all boats with systems to adjust the forestay.

      New Rule 21.1.6(b):

      boat fitted with or carrying on board systems to adjust the forestay while racing shall declare this to the Rating Authority. This includes a system with the power system disconnected or removed from the boat. The boat may then adjust the forestay while racing, but shall not detach the forestay. Locked conventional turnbuckles that are not adjusted while racing need not be declared.

      boat fitted with or carrying on board systems, to adjust the mast foot while racing shall declare this to the Rating Authority. Unless the boat declares that such systems will not be used while racing, the boat may then adjust the mast foot vertically and/or longitudinally while racing.

      Effect: Require a boat to declare if it has an adjustable forestay and rate it on the basis that it is used while racing.

      NOTE: Following the IRC Congress meeting directive this wording has been agreed after the meeting for implementation in the IRC Rule 2019.

      page5image1423753760 page5image1423754080
    Monday
    May212018

    IRC Rule Changes for 2018 (Full

    Download the full rule changes here in pdf format.

    2018 Rule Changes (.pdf)

     

    Wednesday
    May102017

    IRC Rule changes 2017 – a summary

     

    • The definition of STL has been changed to cater for boats that do not use a spinnaker but fly a large headsail from the end of the bowsprit. All ratings will therefore include an STL measurement even if not rated for spinnakers.

    • To simplify the Rule, a new definition Aft Rigging has been added: IRC will no longer distinguish between backstay(s), running backstays or checkstays.

    • New rule 19.6 has been added requiring declaration of materials over specific gravity of 8.0 (eg. lead) in some types of keel fin. This is to counter the trend of moving lead from the bulb into the fin.

    • Rule 2.6 has been updated to reflect actual practice.

    • The new ERS 2017-2020 now incorporate definitions that were previously included in the IRC Rule, so these have been removed or updated as appropriate.

    • A number of detail changes have been made throughout the text to correct typographical errors and inconsistencies in terminology. 

    Monday
    May162016

    IRC Rule changes 2016 – a summary

    • Rule 8.1 now includes a minimum LH of 5.00m to be eligible for an IRC rating (excepting boats previously rated)
    • Bulb Weight will now be recorded on a boat’s certificate where applicable, and Bulb Weight has been added to Rule 8.10.1 and the definitions.
    • Abbreviations for some sail measurements (LLmax, LL, LP, SF) have been updated but the definitions are unchanged.
    • The rule about setting multiple headsails simultaneously has been simplified, and new cutter rig definitions added.
    • IRC notice 2014/01 relating to reefing of spinnakers is now included as part of the spinnaker definition.
    • The definition of a Dayboat now includes an upper LH limit of 10.00m.
    • Rule 21.1.6 is extended to include moving the mast at foot or deck level for Dayboats.
    • Rule 9.8 rating review limits are amended in respect of weights.
    • A number of detail changes have been made throughout the text to correct typographical errors and inconsistencies in terminology, and the definitions have been re-ordered in categories for clarity.

    Download full 2016 rule text & definitions

    Thursday
    May282015

    Changes to IRC Rules For 2015

    The following Rule changes come into effect on 1st June 2015 for South East Asia Registered Boats

    • Rule 4.3 is amended to explicitly state that IRC TCCs may not be amended by any third party and that, except in specific circumstances, adjustment of a boat’s elapsed time to effectively amend an IRC TCC is considered to be modification of an IRC TCC by a third party.

    • Rule 21.3.4 (c) relating to the requirement to declare a whisker pole is deleted as redundant.

    • A new IRC definition of Hull Shell is introduced to clarify the meaning for the purposes of IRC

      Age Date.

    • The IRC definition of Age Date is amended to incorporate the new IRC definition of Hull Shell.

    • The IRC definition of Series Date is amended without practical effect to explicitly include ‘one- off’ boats and to clarify that Series Date does not change if a boat is modified..

    • The IRC definitions of heavy weather jib and storm jib are amended to explicitly refer to the appropriate ISAF Offshore Special Regulations to remove any potential for confusion.. 

    • New definition of Headsail Head Point:
      • Headsail Head Point:
      • ERS G.4.2 (b) shall not apply. Headsail Head Point is defined as: The intersection of the luff, extended as necessary, and the line through the highest point of the sail, excluding attachmentsand any luff tape, at 90 degrees to the luff.